[ad_1]

We have already talked about the masters of the 1970s. And they wrote about Western contemporary designers, whose work it makes sense to follow if you want to better understand this style.

In a new publication, we will talk about the main components of the 1970s as an interior style.

CROSBY STUDIO

Strange bright colors in crazy combinations, bizarre shapes where straight “sticks” and “bubbles” absurdly intersect. Mirror plastic, reflections and crooked mirrors, colored plastic jungle, live and drawn. Diagonal ornaments and op-art drawings on the walls, the floor and even the ceiling… Five years ago it was impossible to imagine all this in an expensive bourgeois interior, and now the more fashionable the interior the more insane. What techniques and solutions have migrated to us from that time, and which of these is at the peak of modern trends?

1. Lounge furniture
In the 1960s, the grown children of the post-war baby boom entered the big world. Their informal way of life and manner of behavior suggested the use not of the usual armchairs, but of couches and seats, where one could lie reclining, not caring about propriety and smoothing the folds on crimplen trousers and skirts. Carpetsself-seds»furniture more reminiscent of the landscape, and other alternative ways of sitting define the face of interiors in the 1970s.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

Such furniture in the 60s and 70s was made by the famous Pierre Paulin, a French designer whose works are distinguished by unusual free forms. Those developments are still held in high esteem: they are produced by Ligne Roset, Artifort, La Cividina. And the designer’s son, Benjamin, is now slowly reproducing in limited editions those masterpieces that are not mass-produced: such as this sofa, once released by Herman Miller and reissued in 2014 by Louis Vuitton. Details can be found at paulinpaulinpaulin.com

The idea of ​​reclining in the living room is by no means alien to modern people. How not alien is the idea of ​​setting something funny and even a little ridiculous in your house. very much in the spirit of the 70s. great shining example Sofa Pack by the Italian company Edra with a teddy bear on a soft polygonal ice float»hit of 2017.

In the photo above: sofa Pack, diz. Francesco Binfare for Edra

spiral architecture

Nomess Copenhagen

2. Wild colors
Love color or hate it, the 1970s was an era of vibrant, sometimes wild colors and color combinations. For every dull, earthy room, there was one that could only be described as an “explosion of color.” Everything became colored, even toilets. Avocado and Orange, Turquoise and Lime, Sunshine Yellow and Cowberry Red the rainbow in these interiors is resting, they are much richer and richer in color.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

In the photo: the interior of the futuristic house Kunstoffhaus FG 2000 designed by Wolfgang Feuerbach, 1968

AMOS

3. Geometry of the 1970s
This is no longer the rectangular boring Bauhaus from the 1920s and not the ball chairs, eggs and bubbles of the 1960s. 1970s furniture this is a free connection of lines and circles, cylinders, arcs, prisms and trapezoids. If the cube then he definitely needs to coexist with a ball, an arc or even a cloud. If a sharp triangular pyramid then she definitely needs roundness nearby. As a result, new unusual things and new unusual impressions from them are born.

Photo: Tahiti table lamp by Ettore Sottsass

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

In the photo: a showroom apartment in Milan, designed by Dimore Studio, one of the most fashionable (if not the most fashionable) design studio in the world right now. They are trendsetters. They are intuitive, they catch what is still in the air, they materialize the collective unconscious. Triangular rug on the floor – with lurex

ABOUT IT…
Inspiration from the 1970s: Designers to learn from

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

Photo: dressing table Chandlo Dressing Table from bd barcelona like a toy folded from different geometric shapes. It seems that the figures are random, but no: the result is a solid, harmonious, balanced object.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

In the photo: bold dynamic drawings that break the shape of the object and its perception a common device in contemporary references to the 1970s. Such are the vases for Lee Broom’s Wedgwood, and so are some of the lamps of his own brand Lee Broom

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

And this is Jaime Hayon’s Palette table, made for the Danish company &traditions. “My table was born after I visited the Alexander Calder exhibition and saw his mobiles. After that, this form was born. And since I didn’t know what material to make it from, we made it from all at once.”

Rounded, regular (circle) and free forms at the same time, contrast of materials (stone, wood, metal), combination of different colors, contrast of smooth shapes of worktops with rectangular bases made of black metal all signs of a trendy style.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

4 Op art
Originated in the 60s, it was already in full bloom in the 70s. But if the designers of the 1970s experimented with this, then our contemporaries behave much more boldly: diagonally oriented geometric ornaments, rhombuses, prisms, parallelograms, hexagons and other crazy graphics settled on the floor, walls, covered the surfaces of wallpaper, carpets, parquet and furniture.

Active geometry built on oblique lines, rhombuses and prisms, optical illusions also a clear modern trend that has returned to us from the 70s. Ordinary geometric shapes will not give even a hundredth of the effect that the diagonal gives.

Pictured: Spectacular geometric carpets by Swedish women’s design group Front premiered at the GAN booth in Cologne at IMM Cologne 2018

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

Active geometry becomes a strong accent in a fashionable modern interior, which is rooted in completely different time periods. Like here: carpets refer to the psychedelic 70s, a rounded sofa to the 50s with their mid-century modern, and a pink armchair with a fringe in shape – to Queen Victoria, and in color – to Marie Antoinette. In fact, this is the most fashionable stand of the new Layered company from the Stockholm Furniture Fair 2018.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

In the photo: Hexagon carpet from the Parquet collection by the Swedish duo Front for the GAN brand. Designers Anna Lindgren and Sofia Lagerkvist have translated the geometric pattern, which resembles the pattern of parquet, into lint-free carpets woven using traditional technology.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

In the photo: the parquet collection by Job Smets and Ninke Tinagel from the provocative Studio Job, which they designed for Bisazza. The main characters in it are diagonal intersections and hexagons, and parquet planks seem to jump out of the floor plane.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

Pictured: The Credenza wardrobe was designed by Patricia Urquiola (shape) and Federico Pepe, an Italian graphic designer known as Le Dictateur (he was responsible for the design on the doors). The cabinet is unusual in that it combines trendy modern graphics with archaic stained glass technique. Produced in a limited edition under the brand Editions Milano

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

5. Brass is everywhere
She changed the gold in the interiors: her brilliance is not so dazzling, her surface is aging more noble, and even if it is a “brass-like” surface, it carries a feeling not of luxury and wealth, but of nobility and depth of time. And although it now seems to be used by everyone and everywhere, exclamations on the topic: “brass is out of fashion now” are premature. Its position is only strengthened by the bright projects of leading designers and companies that build their interiors entirely on this brilliance alone.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

Turning to brass, contemporary designers such as Stefano Giovannoni, Studio Job and Nika Zupanc have incredibly combined the modest modernist forms of the first half of the 20th century with memories of exotic empires, palm trees and the sinking sun in the ocean in the new Ghidini1961 collection. Just like they did in the 70s.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

Tom Dixon’s Brass Lamp, Appealing to “Space” Motifs 19601970s. Those who found the Soviet era may remember such clusters in government offices, sanatoriums, and rest homes. And here they are with us again!

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

Even design icons – such as this 1966 Bulb lamp by Ingo Maurer, included in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art – are now being reissued in brass.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

6. Trend for the tropics and the jungle
It originated with mass tourism in the 1960s, and in the 1970s it became truly ubiquitous. Tropical resorts, North Africa (Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco), the Middle East, in particular, Lebanon — opened up to the world in a broad sense at this time. The interiors were decorated with African masks. Today’s ironic reminder of this fashion is the hit 2017 Primates vase collection by Italian Salmistraro.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

On the photo – wallpaper. Dreams of foggy Singapore and Lake Chad received visual and material confirmation

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

In the interiors, orchids and palm trees, banana trees and pineapples bloomed luxuriantly. Exotic sunrises and oriental carpets, “cucumbers”, arabesques, ikat are in fashion.

Luca Nichetti created the Geo Art carpet for Nodus, or rather, a set of six small rugs, onto which six typical designs from different Asian regions are transferred. They can be separated and mixed in your own way.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

7.Deceptions
A popular trend in the 1970s was fake materials. It began with the advent of plastic in the 1960s, with which it was possible to imitate any surface. Plastic was new, unusual, valuable, desired and loved by both designers and the general public. And the 1970s were the years of plastic coatings. Ettore Sottsass and his bandmates Memphis» actively used laminates under terrazzo, marble, Karelian birch. In the photo — the famous Casablanca Sottsass rack with laminated surfaces, produced under the Memphis brand.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

If the 70s were the era of plastic coatings that imitated other materials: marble (remember the plastic doors of Soviet kitchens?) or metal (the same brass and stainless steel), then modern technologies can turn into marble, for example, glass – as in Patricia Urquiola’s Liquefy tables for Glas Italia. In them, two layers of glass are glued together in such a way that they create a kind of moiré surface, reminiscent of stains of a noble stone, and when you change the angle of view, an illusion of movement is obtained. Such an ironic game technique reduces the pathos of genuine valuable materials. And the designers are happy to play, as the adult children of the disco era did.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

In our view, plastic is a cheap material, not very fashionable, short-lived. But at the same time, it has the widest possibilities: an incredible number of objects can be made from plastic – from laminates imitating various types of colored stone to dishes that look like crystal. The same Patricia Urquiola made for Kartell a collection of dishes similar to those popular in the 1970s – both stylistically and in color. Only now it is not cast or carved glass, but simply plastic – also very in the spirit of the times.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

And the writing desk of Patricia Urquiola for Cappellini made of MDF, covered with a terrazzo print, is directly called: Radical Fake. Premiere of the Milan Salon 2018.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

8 Fur
Of course, the 70s were the years of synthetics: light faux fur coats were worn by fashionistas all over the world with pleasure, and a llama or even a goat skin curled like Angela Davis’ hairstyle could decorate the interior of not only a respectable house in the decaying West, but also a modest apartment of the Soviet esthete. Those times are back!

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

Fur, artificial and natural, shaggy, shaggy and short “like Cheburashka” is found in the collections of the most fashionable designers of our time, including, for example, Tom Dixon (armchairs in the photo above).

Baxter’s booth at Milan Salon 2018 (left) delighted with Nepal designs by Paola Navone in fluffy furs. The faux fur looks exactly like the fur of the Mongolian sheep and has a bit of a retro feel to it, like the 70s rugs made of shaggy skins. These soft even-looking lumps looked especially fun in contrast to the dynamic graphics of carpets and other pieces of furniture.

Ryland Peters & Small | CICO Books

9. All at once!
The most important principle, without which today you will not get a fashionable interior. Using one of the trends does not give the desired result: you need more, more actively, combine several topical motifs in one interior.

Let’s look at real examples in realized interiors. Shot above: shaggy fur, brass, exotic plants (albeit metal ones), space lamps, art objects, classic modernism mixed with streamlined shapes of the 1960s.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

Designer Ekaterina Fedorchenko is one of the main apologists and connoisseurs of the 1970s style in Russia. Her sensational project, which was inspired by this era, is a 650-meter penthouse in the center of Moscow, furnished with items from the master of design of the 20th century Vlad Kagan, contemporary British eclecticist Francis Sultana and Fedorchenko herself. The interior bears many features of that time: the innovation of organic forms, futurism, carelessness and hedonism. It lacks only kitsch and a challenge to good taste, which are not uncommon in the 1970s—the designer decided to take from the past only the worthwhile, only the present.

Design lecture hall by Olga Kosyreva

Here is the furnishing of the new apartment of TV presenter and society lady Svetlana Bondarchuk in Moscow. This interior also refers to the 1970s, which burst into the interior fashion rapidly: both in terms of the color scheme, where deep, complex, muted shades of blue, green, mustard are mixed, and in the selected materials — brass, mirrors, wood, velvet, and in the general mood.

And this 180-meter apartment in a prestigious area of ​​Oslo in a building from the 1890s is the quintessence of trends that came to us from the 1970s – this is color, and brass, and marble countertops, and a combination of objects of different styles. The apartment belongs to the Norwegian gallerist and restaurateur Einar John Ronning and his wife, and the authors of the interior are the architects Heidi Petterswold Nygard and her husband Andreas Nygard, who very rarely take on private projects, and mostly work in the world’s most titled and famous Norwegian architectural company Snøhetta.

YOUR TURN…
Are you mentally prepared for the style of the 1970s? Or do you think that the request for it has not yet come to Russia?

[ad_2]